Fermentations are going strong

Just a week after filling the tanks and the fermentations have been going well. This is to say that the grapes are doing exactly what they should be doing. Nothing has been added besides sulphur. No punchdowns have been performed yet either. We will do a few (literally) once the primary fermentations are just about finished. The fruit on the top is in excellent shape! The cap looks to be pushing evenly and everything is smelling fresh. Also, the samples I’ve pulled are continuing to show differences between the lots. This is very good news. So, not much to report other than to say that we are very pleased thus far.

In this photo you can see the color bleached from some of the grapes due to the addition of sulphur to the must. The color is later regained. Also, there are roughly 3 clusters from a mutation of pinot noir in the vineyard.

One thing should be mentioned, due to the clearance height (of lack thereof) in the cuverie, we will really have to perform pigeage a pied. Better said, we will need to get into the vats and punchdown with our feet. This is because the punchdown tools are much too long to be used effectively. And seriously, it does appeal to me on several other levels anyhow,  one of them is appreciating the fact that seeds won’t be broken by doing the pigeage a pied, which is possible with a punchdown tool. I’m sure there will be one or two pics, but I’ll steer clear of too many since this can come off as seeming touristy.

Cheers

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2 thoughts on “Fermentations are going strong

  1. Hello Ray:

    The grapes in the picture of the fermentor seem to be multi-colored. Why so many light berries?

  2. Hey Martin,
    this is because I had added sulphur to the fermenter prior to the fermentation taking off. This has an effect of ‘bleaching’ the color a bit on the grapes, initially. Though, the grapes do regain their color. The actual yellow berries (some of them at least) are due to the white grapes that have been a pinot noir mutation in the vineyards. These vineyards which produce grapes such as this are over 55 years of age. Its common practice (read: tradition) to keep them in. My estimated quantity of these grapes is about 3 clusters each for two different cuvées. When they are scattered around like this it seems like a lot more however.

    Cheers!

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